Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.723563
Title: An investigation of thermal comfort and the use of indoor transitional space
Author: Hou, Guoying
ISNI:       0000 0004 6425 5715
Awarding Body: Cardiff University
Current Institution: Cardiff University
Date of Award: 2016
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Abstract:
Indoor transitional space plays an important role in the modern building. The thermal environment in indoor transitional spaces can significantly influence users’ thermal perceptions and therefore potentially their use of such spaces. Improving thermal conditions in indoor transitional spaces may encourage people to spend more time in these spaces, and improve the energy performance in indoor transitional spaces and their potential contribution in minimizing cooling and heating loads of the adjacent building. This thesis investigates thermal conditions in indoor transitional spaces, thermal comfort and the relationship between these and people’s use of space. Three case studies were carefully selected in different kinds of buildings in Cardiff, UK to represent a variety of users in similar climatic contexts. The field surveys were carried out during winter and summer and research methods were used: interviews with a structured questionnaire, thermal environment monitoring and observations of human activity. The results show that a solely physiological approach is insufficient to evaluate the thermal comfort in indoor transitional spaces. The results from the occupant comfort survey established the adaptability of users to a wider range of thermal conditions. Environmental variables such as operative temperature could have a great impact on the use of the indoor transitional spaces, and may determine the number of people and activities in them. The study also shows that participants in indoor transitional spaces have a higher thermal tolerance and can accept lower temperature than in other types of spaces, which creates a potential for saving energy.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.723563  DOI: Not available
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