Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.718813
Title: Patients' decision making processes for uncertain, risky medical decisions
Author: Platts, Danielle
ISNI:       0000 0004 6349 0465
Awarding Body: University of Sheffield
Current Institution: University of Sheffield
Date of Award: 2016
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Abstract:
Literature Review: The systematic literature review critically evaluates and synthesises the available literature on the impact of uncertainty for patients involved in their medical decision making. Studies were identified through electronic database searches. Ten studies were included in the review. A meta-ethnography approach was used to synthesise the qualitative studies which was then considered in line with the quantitative paper. The findings demonstrate that uncertainty is present in the decision making process and the results are outlined under the following themes; 'initial uncertainty and fear', 'an uncertain decision and uncertain information', 'an uncertain choice' and 'coping with uncertainty'. The methodological limitations of the reviewed studies and implications for clinical practice and future research are discussed. Research Report: The study explored the decision making process for patients who were diagnosed with an unruptured cerebral aneurysm and elected to have neurosurgical clipping. Using semi-structured interviews, 10 participants gave accounts of their decision making processes which were analysed in line with Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis. Results were discussed under the themes of 'the tension between self-determination and responsibility for others', 'relationship with the surgeon and NHS', 'life and death' and 'post-surgical reflections and sense-making'. Participants valued being part of the decision making process, and even when treatment did not have a successful outcome, participants did not regret their choice. The clinical implications of these findings are discussed in addition to recommendations for future research.
Supervisor: Walsh, Sue ; Tooth, Claire ; Isaac, Claire Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (D.Clin.Psy.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.718813  DOI: Not available
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