Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.715148
Title: The immensity of confrontable selves : the 'split subject' and multiple identities in the experimental novels of Christine Brooke-Rose
Author: Jones, Stephanie
ISNI:       0000 0004 6352 0724
Awarding Body: Aberystwyth University
Current Institution: Aberystwyth University
Date of Award: 2016
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Abstract:
Christine Brooke-Rose was an extraordinary woman. There are a number of remarkable periods in her life including working at Bletchley Park during the Second World War as well as working at the experimental university, Paris VIII at Vincennes during the socio political tumult of 1968. Her dual nationality as a French and British citizen, her bilingualism, and her split residence between England and France positioned her at a rare vantage point to be able to comment upon these strange and significant moments in the twentieth century from multiple perspectives. Taking her biographical experiences into account, it is no surprise that the theme of multiple identities and ‘split selves’ figured prominently in Christine Brooke-Rose’s life and work. The skeletal biographical details of her life have been fairly well documented in the years since her death. However, before 2012, the reader had only been able to find the somewhat clinical, but informative gobbets of information about the author’s life regurgitated in such companion texts as World Authors 1950-1970 (1975), The Oxford Companion to English Literature (2009) and Encyclopaedia of British Writers, 19th and 20th Centuries (2009). With the distribution of multiple obituaries in a number of major broadsheet newspapers, and the publication of a few important and considered academic studies of her writing over the past twenty years (Birch, 1994; Canepari-Labib, 2002; Lawrence, 2010; Bartha, 2014), certain dark, neglected corners of her life and work have been illuminated, presenting her as a significant and valuable exponent of twentieth-century literature.
Supervisor: Woods, Timothy ; Barry, Peter Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.715148  DOI: Not available
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