Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.713281
Title: Taking leisure seriously : an investigation of leisure to work enrichment
Author: Kelly, Ciara
ISNI:       0000 0004 6350 3588
Awarding Body: University of Sheffield
Current Institution: University of Sheffield
Date of Award: 2016
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Abstract:
Leisure is under-researched in the enrichment and work-life interface literature, despite the fact that it is an increasingly valued life domain among employees. This thesis seeks to address the lack of work in this area by examining the effects of leisure on work through the lens of serious leisure. This thesis has three principal aims: 1) To examine whether serious leisure generates psychological and affective resources 2) To examine whether serious leisure activities improve work performance via these psychological resources 3) To explore the impact of individual episodes of serious leisure activity on work performance and compare this to the impact of habitual patterns of engagement over a longer time scale. I refer to these different approaches as episodic and habitual serious leisure respectively. To address the aims of the thesis I carried out a 10-day daily diary to assess the effects of episodic serious leisure, and a monthly survey over 7 months to assess habitual serious leisure. I found that serious leisure was related to increased self-efficacy, but the pattern of enrichment was different for episodic verses habitual leisure. There was a direct positive effect of time spent in episodic serious leisure on self-efficacy. In contrast to this, the effect of time spent in habitual leisure on self-efficacy was only present for individuals when their work roles were less similar to their leisure roles. I also found differences in the relationship between serious leisure and work and the relationship between casual leisure and work. These findings indicate that leisure is an influential non-work activity for work-life enrichment and our understanding of these relationships is improved by considering the meaning and motivation behind the pursuit of leisure. Additionally this thesis highlights the importance of considering the time scales which are involved in the process of enrichment.
Supervisor: Strauss, K. ; Arnold, J. Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.713281  DOI: Not available
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