Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.653320
Title: Forensic examination of blood and blood stains
Author: Kerr, Douglas
Awarding Body: University of Edinburgh
Current Institution: University of Edinburgh
Date of Award: 1927
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Abstract:
Although the examination of blood stains forms an important part of Forensic Laboratory work, text books only mention routine tests for stains to which at the most, two or three pages are given. Examination of blood other than stains is never considered. Being brought into contact with cases calling for examination beyond the usual routine, I have turned in vain for aid to text books of Forensic Medicine, Toxicology, Chemistry and Physiology. Especially in the case of Physiology was I led astray at first, as the descriptions there relate to pure substances which are not encountered in Forensic Medicine. Whilst cases requiring investigation of uncommon forms of haemoglobin are few, when they occur it is not merely a description of the compound, but minute details and references which are required. I have endeavoured to supply this. Each statement and test has been carefully examined by me before being accepted; save a few cases where the reverse is stated. Some of the recognized tests have been the object of original investigations, and in almost all cases experimental enquiries have been made into their comparative value and fallacies. Details of these researches are not given here, the results having been summarized. Wherever I have stated my opinion it is based on practical experience and investigations. Enquiries into the subject of blood groups are still progressing, but I am not aware of any other work in English dealing with the present position as here summarized. Owing to its present prominence, the examination of Alcohol in the blood has been included. An Appendix describes Carbon Monoxide poisoning, to an investigation of which I devoted many months last year. Whilst I have endeavoured to present in this Thesis a complete survey of Forensic blood work which a Medical jurist will find of value, it has also been my aim to make this understandable to one commencing the study of the subjects.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (M.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.653320  DOI: Not available
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