Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.643736
Title: Host specificity of some aphid predators
Author: Mondal, N. U.
Awarding Body: University of London
Current Institution: Imperial College London
Date of Award: 1972
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Abstract:
The first section reviews the host specificity of some aphidephagous insects including chrysopidae, and some general methods are discussed. A comparative study of the morphology of two strains of C. carnea Steph. is described in second section. A study of the effects of different rearing methods, temperature and host plants on the food value of a suitable aphid prey on the development of predators, the A. bipunctata and C. carnea was made. The ability of the C. carnea larva to tolerate different degrees of food shortage was studied. Estimations of biological attributes of C. carnea as a predator in relation to five different aphid species was made as follows:- the total amount of different aphid species required to complete development, the "predatory value" of C. carnea larvae for different prey species, the mortality and rates of development on different aphid species as diet, the causes of unsuitability of certain aphid prey and the effect of aphid food on fecundity and longivity of resulting adults of C. carnea. Ability of C. carnea larvae to distinguish suitable from unsuitable foods was examined. Attempts were made to quantitatively estimate the food removed from different aphid prey species. The histology of aphid remains after feeding by C. carnea was examined. Searching behaviour of larval G.carnea was studied. The ability of adult C. carnea to choose appropriate oviposition sites was examined by preliminary experiments in the laboratory. The results are discussed in relation to possible value of C. carnea in biological control.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.643736  DOI: Not available
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