Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.623990
Title: The mechanism of frictional oscillation
Author: Antoniou, Solon
Awarding Body: University of London
Current Institution: Imperial College London
Date of Award: 1972
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Abstract:
Frictional oscillations, considered as an engineering problem, are of great importance because they produce increased wear rate, inaccurate conditions of operation in machine tools or servomechanism s, noise and similar unwanted phenomena. The function μ=μ(v) which governs frictional oscillations is extremely difficult to determine accurately during the frictional oscillation cycle and that is the main reason why simple models with a hypothetical μ=μ(v) have previously been employed. The combination of a new mathematical model for frictional oscillations along with a topological solution to the equation of motion, enables the characteristics of frictional oscillation to be predicted in practice and the function μ=μ(v) to be derived experimentally. The model meets the requirement for a generalized explanation of several different forms of frictional oscillations, such as the "reversed stick-slip", the "frictional microvibrations" and the like. Experimental application of the method to several combinations of specimens and lubricants, most commonly used in tribological practice, showed that successful results can easily be obtained; and revealed the existence of a twin frictional mechanism which explains readily some of the peculiarities of frictional oscillations. The function μ=μ(v) is obtained experimentally within very short periods of time (in some cases in less than 0.01 sec), and this is one of the min advantages of the technique, because time variables which affect the frictional process (e.g. wear and environmental changes) are excluded, there by eliminating a source of major errors.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.623990  DOI: Not available
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