Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.623832
Title: State-dependent routing rules in telephone networks
Author: Kigundu, Samuel Eridadi
Awarding Body: University of London
Current Institution: Imperial College London
Date of Award: 1971
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Abstract:
In this thesis we study the performance of network state-dependent routing rules. Our motivation is to maximize the traffic carrying capacity of any given telephone network for any offered traffic pattern, i.e. to give "the best" overall grade of service. There are two other considerations. Firstly, I am keenly aware that the optimization of the overall (network) grade of service tends to be accompanied by a debasement in the service given to the smaller parcels of traffic. I have endeavoured to prevent this debasement. Secondly, alternate routing schemes usually give a very poor service when the network is subjected to an overload. I have therefore concentrated on those routing schemes that always give a performance that is at least as good as that given when no alternate routing is used. The results show that we can carry up to about six per cent more traffic using the state-dependent rules than we can carry without alternate routing. We have succeeded in providing adequate protection to all parcels of traffic, and in realising a consistently good overload performance. Another important and exciting outcome of this study is the concept of "time to congestion" which has played a central role in our routing schemes. I believe that an improvement in the traffic carrying capacity of six per cent is, by itself, too small to justify the investment necessary to implement the state-dependent routing rules. I say "by itself" because the use of such rules may also have the advantage of enhancing the network security. Nevertheless, the chief recommendation is that this work should be continued and extended; this the sis is only a preliminary study. We would, for example, like to examine the performance of networks having more than half a dozen exchanges. And we look forward to better state-dependent routing rules being devised.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.623832  DOI: Not available
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