Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.540727
Title: An investigation of the relationship between self-ambivalence, self-discrepancy, and autogenous and reactive obsessions
Author: Pointer, Jonathan
ISNI:       0000 0004 2706 7037
Awarding Body: University of Surrey
Current Institution: University of Surrey
Date of Award: 2011
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Abstract:
Objective: Recent theorising highlights a role for self-concept discrepancies in the onset and maintenance of obsessions. This theorising suggests that self-concept discrepancies might be more influential in the occurrence of autogenous as opposed to reactive obsessions. The aim of the current study was to investigate the relationship between self-ambivalence, self-discrepancy, and autogenous and reactive obsessions whilst controlling for dysphoria. Design: This study employed a cross-sectional correlational design in a non-clinical general population sample. Three hundred and seventy-six (22.6% male, mean age: 26.60, SD: 9.27; 77.4% female, mean age: 26.13, SD: 8.63) participants completed measures of self-ambivalence, self-discrepancy, obsessionality (both autogenous and reactive obsessions) and dysphoria. Findings: Self-ambivalence was positively associated with obsessionality, after controlling for dysphoria. There was no difference in the strength of the positive association between autogenous obsessions and self-ambivalence, and between reactive obsessions, after controlling for dysphoria. There was no association between self-discrepancies and obsessionality, after controlling for dysphoria. Conclusions: Self-ambivalence plays a small part in obsessionality, but subtyping obsessions into autogenous and reactive may not be a helpful distinction. Although self-discrepancy was not associated with obsessionality, there was a strong association between self-discrepancy and dysphoria, which may have clinical implications for alleviating negative mood. Other theoretical and clinical implications are discussed, as are suggestions for further research.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (D.Psych.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.540727  DOI: Not available
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