Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.527587
Title: The reputations of Sir Francis Burdett
Author: Arnold, Victoria
ISNI:       0000 0004 2695 753X
Awarding Body: University of Kent
Current Institution: University of Kent
Date of Award: 2010
Availability of Full Text:
Access from EThOS:
Access from Institution:
Abstract:
Sir Francis Burdett was one of the most well-known, popular and controversial figures of his day. He played an instrumental and significant role in the development of the parliamentary reform movement and also in several other liberal campaigns of the period, notably Catholic Emancipation and humanitarian measures such as prison reform and the abolition of flogging in the army. His role both as a wealthy gentleman and a parliamentarian ensured that, unlike many of his radical allies, Burdett had a means by which to voice his views and was less vulnerable to, though far from entirely immune from, prosecution for expressing them. This ensured that he was a central figure in the survival and direction of reform movements. Burdett's parliamentary speeches and public addresses were published as pamphlets and frequently reported in the press. He was the subject of a large number of satirical prints and also the recipient of hundreds of letters from aggrieved members of the public seeking redress, or from politicians seeking his advice and/or co-operation. Consequently, there is a large quantity of both printed literature and manuscript sources relating to Burdett, much of which has yet to be fully explored. He aroused strong. and often extreme, feelings amongst his contemporaries, from passionate devotion to intense hatred. Yet, despite Burdett's importance, his notoriety, and the abundance of sources relating to him, there has been surprisingly little study of his life, career, and historical reputations.
Supervisor: Ditchfield, Grayson M. Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.527587  DOI:
Keywords: D History General and Old World
Share: