Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.515410
Title: Cognitive effects of task complexity on prospective remembering
Author: Kingsley, Barbara E.
ISNI:       0000 0004 2689 7872
Awarding Body: Roehampton University
Current Institution: University of Roehampton
Date of Award: 2010
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Abstract:
The current research was concerned with cognitive processes supporting the ability to remember and carry out previously planned tasks or actions. Specifically, focus was directed towards comparisons between event-based (externally cued) and time-based (internally cued) remembering. Previous research had generally centred on event-based tasks, with much less research reported investigating either time-based remembering, or the relationship between the two. The principal issues addressed methodological concerns, and the interaction between the two types of task in relation to ongoing demands on limited resources. Following stringent methodological considerations, a series of six experiments, based on the Einstein & McDaniel (1990) paradigm, were conducted. Both within-subjects, (event- and time-based tasks investigated together; Experiments 1, 2, 4, 5 and 6) and between-subjects designs (Experiment 3), were used to investigate the initial hypothesis that event-based remembering would exceed time-based performance regardless of ongoing cognitive demands. However, the interaction between event- and time-based remembering was more complex than had originally been thought, and the results revealed that prospective remembering was inextricably linked to concurrent processing demands, but that resources could be consciously manipulated to enhance performance. All tasks were found to require both capacity-consuming and automatic retrieval processes, but the proportions and purpose of each process differed as a function of the task type. Results are discussed with regard to retrieval processes, speed-accuracy costs and relevant task importance.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.515410  DOI: Not available
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