Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.493399
Title: Women's lives in a shipbuilding community : Irish Catholic Port Glasgow in the 1930s
Author: Hagan, Hugh Patrick
ISNI:       0000 0001 3523 8498
Awarding Body: University of Edinburgh
Current Institution: University of Edinburgh
Date of Award: 2001
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Abstract:
A conventional account of the shipbuilding town of Port Glasgow might concentrate on the male side of that community, on the shipyards, the workers and their culture. Instead, this thesis explores features of that community from the perspective of the lives of Port Glasgow's Irish Catholic female population. While male experience is also included, the focus is upon female life in an urban industrial setting. In the main, the inter-war years and the period immediately following provide the time frame, although material from other periods is also included. Importantly, the thesis draws extensively on interviews conducted with women and men who experienced the period and the place at first hand. These recordings have been lodged in the archives of the School of Scottish Studies. After outlining the methodology and providing the historical context of this industrial centre, including an account of its development and built environment, the chapters focus on the home and the household and what helped to create and sustain these - courtship and marriage and the place of entertainment and leisure pursuits and courtship; the impact of housing provision on married relationships; the networks in place to assist young couples in finding a home; the circumstances of home-making; family life; the role of religion and cultural beliefs and traditions within the home, and the interaction between these and the wider religious community and institutions. This thesis brings to light experience which has hitherto received relatively little attention and shows the value of a critical use of oral testimony for exploring and understanding lives which have contributed to Scotland's industrial history.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.493399  DOI: Not available
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