Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.479224
Title: Modelling of blood flow through heart valves and simulation of particle transport in blood
Author: Shojai, Leila
ISNI:       0000 0001 3407 0929
Awarding Body: Loughborough University
Current Institution: Loughborough University
Date of Award: 2007
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Abstract:
Computer modelling provides powerful and flexible methodology for the predictive simulation of complex flow systems. However, despite the versatility of this methodology quantitative modelling of blood flow through human heart presents a difficult and challenging problem. Although derivation of appropriate governing equations representing combined blood flow and soft solid deformation of the tissues of heart valves does not pose any particular theoretical problems. Accurate solution of such equations is not a trivial matter. Another source of complexity in the modelling of a biological system such as blood flow/heart valve deformation is the uncertainties associated with the available physical and rheological data that are required to obtain quantitative simulations. Variations between individual situations is usually considerable which precludes broad generalizations. In this research project an attempt has been made to identify the most important aspects of the blood flow through human heart valves. This has led to making rational approximations which render the development of a model for the described system both possible and meaningful. The main focus have been on the best use of available software and mathematical schemes. In cases where existing computational or mathematical tools were considered to be incapable of tackling realistic situations new techniques have been developed. It has been shown that using the modelling methodology which is developed in this research study a number of important and reliable conclusions about the operation of heart valves can be drawn. This information can in turn be used to design artificial heart valves.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Loughborough University
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.479224  DOI: Not available
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