Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.462628
Title: The aesthetics of a phenomenologist : Mikel Dufrenne's "La phénoménologie de l'expérience esthétique"
Author: Lamb, Virginia
ISNI:       0000 0001 3604 2817
Awarding Body: University of Warwick
Current Institution: University of Warwick
Date of Award: 1976
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Abstract:
This thesis aims to give an exposition of, and discuss, the aesthetics propounded by Mikel Dufrenne, in the Phénoménologie de l'expérienoe esthétique , It is not the intention here to cover the total aesthetic output of Dufrenne, presented in other works suchh as Le poétique , and a number of articles. One of the principle features of Dufrenne's work - his notion of the a priori in art - is discussed generally in the first two cchapters, leading up to a detailed ccritique in the third. In Chapter One the main question is of the nature of art, and whether it is •quasi-pour-sol', and the distinction of 'work of art' and 'aesthetic object'. In Chapter Two I have taken Dufrenne's ideas on the status of art - its creation, perception and self-sufficiency. All those topics relate in some nay to the a priori, which is fully dealt with subsequently - in its relation to Kant and aesthetics, in particular the affective a priori. In each chapter I have dealt with subjects which can be discussed in their own right. The first three cchapters are taken with the idea of the a priori very much to the fore - although each topic is treated as of value in itself - but the fourth and fifth chapters are less tied to the a priori. Here I have taken three of the most important topics in aesthetics, the aesthetic attitude, expression and meaning, and laid more emphasis on Dufrenne's ability to note particular objective features of art. These topics, particularly the former two, are not only much discussed in analytic aesthetics, but are also subjects which Dufrenne considers of primary importance. I conclude that Dufrenne is mistaken in his view of the a priori in art, but contributes to aesthetics - though less than often supposed - especially with regard to noting i13 objective features.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.462628  DOI: Not available
Keywords: B Philosophy (General)
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