Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.391742
Title: The developing pattern of horse racing in Yorkshire 1700-1749 : an analysis of the people and the places
Author: Middleton, Iris Maud
ISNI:       0000 0001 3397 6681
Awarding Body: De Montfort University
Current Institution: De Montfort University
Date of Award: 2000
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Abstract:
This thesis seeks to examine the structure of horse racing in the early eighteenth century, with particular regard to the part it played in the Yorkshire leisure calendar. The subject is a largely untouched area of study, but by extensive use of contemporary material, it attempts to form a cohesive picture of the horse-racing scene during the period. The impact of parliamentary interference to curb the perceived effect on the working population and the provision of suitable animals for the military has been discussed, as has the organisation and funding of the races. The reasons for the timing of the meetings takes into account how the yearly racing calendar was organised relative to work and holiday times, as well as the significance of the days of the week. The length of the meetings and their integration with other leisure interests has been included to show that racing played a prominent part in the social and economic life of the times, and was controlled by the influence or various interested parties. Two chapters have been devoted to the owners and breeders of the horses, although only a minority can now be identified. From these statistics, maps have been compiled that indicate the local and national importance of Yorkshire racing. The methods of two breeders have been examined to show that some of their techniques were surprisingly enlightened for their day. Finally, the status of the identified owners is given consideration, and shows that although the aristocracy and gentry were well represented, it is likely that a wide spectrum of the population was involved, since the unidentified owners were more numerous and probably of a lower status.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.391742  DOI: Not available
Keywords: History
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