Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.347551
Title: Popular sanctions in the rural community, 1700-1880, with special reference to folk community practices and responses
Author: Bushaway, Bob
ISNI:       0000 0001 3512 0043
Awarding Body: University of Southampton
Current Institution: University of Southampton
Date of Award: 1983
Availability of Full Text:
Access from EThOS:
Full text unavailable from EThOS. Please try the link below.
Access from Institution:
Abstract:
This thesis aims to examine popular sanctions in English rural society during the period 1700 to 1880, against the background of social and economic change, and to consider how the framework of customary folk practice was maintained and what forms it took. In particular, it is apparent that custom linked together the components of the local community calendar and reflected, on the one hand, the symbolism of social cohesion in which the rural labourer was able to defend popular rights, and, on the other, provided opportunities for socially disruptive behaviour and established a cultural environment for more orthodox movements of social protest. This customary framework, in part transmitted forward from the later Middle Ages and early modern period, provided an essential context which informed the lives and experiences of both the labouring poor and the rural elite alike. The changing social position of one section of rural society - farmers, landowners, proprietors - affected this framework and conflict over the maintenance of popular customs occurred. Popular customary collective behaviour sought to preserve such rights as gleaning, fuel gathering, access to recreational venues, and non-institutionalised largess collections, by binding them in ceremony and ritual often adapted from older forms or other festivals. New statute laws and legal judgements were used to extinguish such rights and the ceremonies concerned were opposed, destroyed or remodelled to conform with Victorian middle class moral attitudes and values.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.347551  DOI: Not available
Keywords: Anthropology
Share: