Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.324694
Title: Mindreading difficulties in the siblings of people with Asperger syndrome : evidence for a genetic influence in the abnormal development of a specific cognitive domain
Author: Dorris, Liam
ISNI:       0000 0001 3429 5255
Awarding Body: University of Glasgow
Current Institution: University of Glasgow
Date of Award: 1999
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Abstract:
People with epilepsy and learning disabilities pose a challenge in terms of clinical management and research investigation, and to date, the measurement of outcomes in this population has been limited (Espie, Kerr, Paul, O'Brien, Betts, et al, 1997). An audit within the Greater Glasgow Community and Mental Health Services was conducted during 1997 concerning adult epilepsy sufferers who have learning disabilities, and who are known to Community Learning Disabilities Teams (CLDTs) covering the Glasgow area. The present study provides a preliminary demographic analysis of these data. The primary purpose of the study was to identify patterns of service use of people with epilepsy and learning disabilities. It was anticipated that this would help to inform service planning and delivery. The study found that multiple seizure types were a common presentation, and rates of anti-epileptic drug (AED) polytherapy were high (49.8%), in a group of people who have learning disabilities and epilepsy. Rates of attendance at specialist services such as Neurology and Psychiatry were modest at 38% and 50% respectively. Given the multiple needs of this group who have been described as having epilepsy plus, services may not be offering these clients adequate management in terms of optimal treatment or assessment.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (D.Clin.Psy.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.324694  DOI: Not available
Keywords: Learning disabilities; Epilepsy; Autism
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