Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.248068
Title: Control cognitions in pain management group programme participants : locus of control versus self efficacy beliefs
Author: Gold, Ann
ISNI:       0000 0001 3501 7513
Awarding Body: University of Surrey
Current Institution: University of Surrey
Date of Award: 2002
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Abstract:
Professional Dossier Presented in the Professional Dossier are three linked reports which together lead to a number of recommendations for the involvement of significant others in a Pain Management Group Programme (PMGP). These reports contain: (1) a content analysis of responses to a questionnaire eliciting anonymous feedback from patients completing the PMGP with resulting changes in clinical practice. One suggestion was for the involvement of significant others in the PMGP. (2) A survey of current practice in the UK regarding the involvement of significant others in PMGPs which revealed problems with low attendance and (3) a qualitative study using interpretative phenomenological analysis with 12 partners of patients completing a PMGP to examine possible reasons for non-attendance and to identify key issues which could be considered when planning how best to involve partners in pain management. Academic Dossier Psychological Approaches to Non-Cardiac Chest Pain Qualitative Research Methods and Psychological Understanding of Chronic Pain Research Dossier "Control Cognitions in Pain Management Group Programme Participants: Self-Efficacy versus Locus of Control Beliefs" The aims of this research were: To examine whether pain-specific self-efficacy (SE) and locus of control (LOC) beliefs independently co-vary with concurrent levels of pain intensity, disability and distress, and whether changes in SE and LOC beliefs independently co-vary with post-treatment changes in pain intensity, disability and distress.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Psy.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.248068  DOI: Not available
Keywords: Significant others
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