Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.731923
Title: Production and impaired regulation of neutrophil extracellular traps following severe thermal injury, implications for sepsis and multiple organ failure
Author: Dinsdale, Robert Jonathon
ISNI:       0000 0004 6494 7754
Awarding Body: University of Birmingham
Current Institution: University of Birmingham
Date of Award: 2017
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Abstract:
Advancements in burn care have improved immediate outcome, however, the prevalence of sepsis and multiple organ failure (MOF) remain significant. Although well characterised the mechanisms responsible for the pathogenesis of MOF and increased propensity to infection are poorly understood. Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) provide protection against invading pathogens but also contribute to thrombosis. Sepsis is required for NET generation following severe thermal injury. Quantification of circulating NET biomarkers shows good discriminatory power for diagnosis of sepsis. Interestingly, neutrophils isolated from 24 patients with severe thermal injuries, ≥ 15% total body surface area, had a significantly reduced ability to form NETs ex vivo, potentially mediated by phenotypical changes of neutrophils and inhibitory effects of formyl peptides. This thesis identified a major biological mechanism driving MOF after severe thermal injury, namely the compromise to the actin scavenging system which leads to reduced DNAse activity and a build-up of circulating DNA. Preliminary analysis suggests that DNAse activity can be restored by prehospital use of fresh frozen plasma following major trauma. Thus, administration of blood products or manipulation of the actin scavenging system is a potential therapeutic target. This thesis has identified a number of novel mechanisms responsible for the regulation of NETs following severe thermal injuries and their implications for sepsis and MOF.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Scar Free Foundation
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.731923  DOI: Not available
Keywords: RC Internal medicine
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