Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.727389
Title: Magma-cryosphere interactions on Mars : the influence of heat-transfer mechanisms on surface morphology
Author: Tyson, Shelly
ISNI:       0000 0004 6424 5357
Awarding Body: Lancaster University
Current Institution: Lancaster University
Date of Award: 2016
Availability of Full Text:
Access from EThOS:
Abstract:
Mars is thought to have a planet-wide cryosphere of several kilometres depth consisting of a mixture of rock and permanently frozen ice. The physical processes occurring during magma-cryosphere interaction (MCI) appear to have played a large part in the morphological development of many regions of Mars. The aim of this thesis was to investigate the physical and thermal processes that may take place X during non-explosive MCI. A mass-balance heat-flow model was developed to determine if MCIs could have independently resulted in the formation of features seen on Mars. Laboratory analogue experiments were used to investigate the effects resulting from the heating of a cryosphere analogue over a range of conditions. Two phase (solid particles and liquid water or air) and three phase (solid particles of sand or ice, liquid water and steam) systems were investigated. This enabled the identification of several heat transfer mechanisms; the dominance of these mechanisms varied with the conditions in each experiment. The influence of different heat transfer mechanisms on the development of surface features was also studied. This research has highlighted the complexity of the heat transfer mechanisms and physical interactions that take place during non-explosive magma-cryosphere processes on Mars. We have determined that heat transfer mechanisms can have a significant directional component that results in specific experimental surface morphologies. Similarity to Martian landforms provides insight into their formation mechanisms. This research provides constraints to assist identification and classification of newly discovered landforms within Mars’ landscape.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.727389  DOI: Not available
Share: