Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.727307
Title: Body Mass Index, avoidance and psychosocial factors : what moderates the impact of brief mirror exposure and other interventions on the body image of women?
Author: Trippett, E. M.
ISNI:       0000 0004 6424 0732
Awarding Body: University of Sheffield
Current Institution: University of Sheffield
Date of Award: 2017
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Abstract:
Literature Review: This systematic review sought to determine whether interventions can reduce body dissatisfaction for adults, and whether body mass index (BMI) moderates the effectiveness of body dissatisfaction interventions. A search of two databases produced 14 studies, which generated 21 treatment groups. Where data were available, the relationships between effect size, quality score, publication date and treatment group mean BMI were calculated. A range of body dissatisfaction interventions were found to be effective, in particular those delivered in person, in groups, and using CBT components. There was a strong correlation between study quality and intervention effect size. Larger treatment effect sizes were found among participants with a heavier BMI. Research Report: This study used a non-randomized experimental design to determine the impact of brief mirror exposure on a non-clinical sample of women with a healthy body mass index (BMI) and women with an overweight/obese BMI. It examined the moderating effect of reassurance-seeking, social anxiety, and body avoidance. Forty-six women completed a battery of measures and undertook a 15-minute mirror exposure intervention. Analyses showed that mirror exposure was effective at improving the body perception and satisfaction of overweight/obese women. Reassurance-seeking, social anxiety, and body image avoidance did not affect the impact of mirror exposure.
Supervisor: Waller, Glenn Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (D.Clin.Psy.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.727307  DOI: Not available
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