Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.725463
Title: The relationship between centre and periphery in the Ottoman era of experimentation with, and adaptation of, institutions for fiscal demands : the cases of Kozani, Serfice, and Velvendos, ca. 1690-ca.1820
Author: Lamprakis, Dimitrios K.
ISNI:       0000 0004 6423 7509
Awarding Body: University of Birmingham
Current Institution: University of Birmingham
Date of Award: 2017
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Abstract:
This dissertation is an attempt to describe and analyse the history of the relationship between the imperial centre and a minor peripheral area, but also the first step towards a more complete understanding of the history of the areas of Kozani, Serfice, and Velvendos during the 18th century, on the basis of both Ottoman and Greek primary sources, in an attempt to replace the old and, rather obsolete, nationalist narratives prevalent in the writings of the local amateur historians. Through the examination of the tax-farming system, on the one hand, and the timar system, on the other, in the areas under study, this dissertation addresses the developments that occurred at a local level in a period of Ottoman history marked by great changes and experimentation with new fiscal practices. It is also the aim of this dissertation to prove that the centre was represented locally by the local magnates and notables, who, by serving the interests of the absentee Istanbul-based élite, acted as representatives of the centre in their localities, and formed factions which vied for supremacy and served their respective interests at a local level. Thus, it supports the idea that the centre made the local notables, for as long as local notables made the centre in their given society and locality.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.725463  DOI: Not available
Keywords: D204 Modern History ; DE The Mediterranean Region. The Greco-Roman World
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