Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.725450
Title: The effect of acquired brain injury on theory of mind and decision making
Author: Barker-Ellis, Clare Helen
ISNI:       0000 0004 6423 6522
Awarding Body: University of Birmingham
Current Institution: University of Birmingham
Date of Award: 2017
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Abstract:
VOLUME ONE: The first paper is a meta-analysis of theory of mind (ToM) impairment in individuals who have experienced a Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI). Twenty-eight comparisons of TBI and control group performance on four ToM tasks were analysed: first-order belief (FOTOM), second order belief (SOTOM), understanding indirect speech (IS) and social faux pas tasks. Medium to large effect sizes indicated moderate to severe impairment in ToM abilities in individuals who have experienced a TBI. The highest effect size was observed in understanding IS (SMD=0.92), followed by faux pas (SMD=0.83), SOTOM (SMD=0.80) and finally FOTOM (SMD=0.53). Evidence is presented regarding the severity of, and factors influencing ToM impairment in individuals who have experienced a TBI. The second paper is an empirical research study of the role of cognitive biases in healthcare decision-making. Patients with multiple sclerosis (n=58), non-neurological orthopaedic patients (n=46) and healthy control participants (n=55) completed a series of computerised experiments. Implications for a Dual Process account of reasoning are discussed and clinical applications of findings for the development of treatment decision aids are identified. The third paper is an executive summary for the dissemination of findings to the public and relevant stakeholders. VOLUME TWO: Five Clinical Practice Reports.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (D.Clin.Psy.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.725450  DOI: Not available
Keywords: BF Psychology
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