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Title: Using illness perceptions and coping to understand distress and quality of life in carers of stroke survivors
Author: Waller, Denise Catherine
Awarding Body: UCL (University College London)
Current Institution: University College London (University of London)
Date of Award: 2005
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Abstract:
The role of illness perceptions and coping in distress and quality of life in carers of stroke survivors is investigated. The first part is a review of the literature concerning the impact of stroke on carers and the research investigating determinants of poor outcomes in these individuals. Theoretical frameworks are examined with emphasis on the potential contribution of Leventhal's self-regulation model, which provides a useful framework for investigating illness perceptions and coping in stroke carer outcomes. The empirical paper investigated the role of illness perceptions and coping in distress and quality of life in carers of stroke survivors. Seventy-two carers completed postal questionnaires. Findings indicated an important role of illness perceptions and coping in carer outcomes. Illness perceptions accounted for variance in carer distress, psychological quality of life and social relationships, over and above carer, stroke survivor and illness characteristics. Emotional representations and belief in a psychosocial cause both independently predicted greater distress. Perceptions of greater treatment control independently predicted better psychological well-being and better social relationships. Coping added significant variance in psychological and social quality of life with less use of passive coping independently predicting better psychological well-being and better social relationships. Interpretation of the findings, implications and suggestions for further research are discussed. The critical appraisal examines further the strengths and weaknesses of the study. Theoretical and clinical implications and suggestions for further research are elaborated.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.724596  DOI: Not available
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