Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.723559
Title: The role of schools in fostering pupil resilience
Author: Neville, Victoria
Awarding Body: Canterbury Christ Church University
Current Institution: Canterbury Christ Church University
Date of Award: 2017
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Abstract:
This study investigated the role of specialist provisions for pupils with social, emotional and behaviour difficulties (SEBD) in fostering resilience. The role schools play in resilience development was considered by measuring the association between the length of time a student had been in school with the strength of their resilience measured by a standardised test of resilience. Furthermore, possible ways in which resilience might develop in school were explored by looking at the possible mediating variables of having a sense of connection to school and having a significant peer relationship in school. The role of trait emotional intelligence (TEI) was also explored in this model by adding individual TEI as a moderating factor. Thirty-eight pupils from two SEBD schools took part in completing self-report questionnaires with the researcher. The length of time pupils spent in specialist schools was found to be predictive of both resilience resources and vulnerability, however none of the proposed variables explained this association. Exploratory analysis found TEI alone to be the most significant predictor of resilience outcomes. The theoretical implications are considered. The difficulties in measuring resilience as a construct are discussed, as well as the importance of completing research with this population, despite the challenges.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (D.Clin.Psy.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.723559  DOI: Not available
Keywords: BF0721 Child psychology ; BF0698 Personality ; LC4001 Children and youth with disabilities
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