Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.720608
Title: Forward modelling of transient events in the solar atmosphere
Author: Price, Daniel James
ISNI:       0000 0004 6349 3586
Awarding Body: Aberystwyth University
Current Institution: Aberystwyth University
Date of Award: 2017
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Abstract:
The solar atmosphere is a highly magnetised plasma covering a wide range of temperatures from the thousands of Kelvin to the millions. How exactly it reaches such extreme temperatures remains unknown. There are however numerous events that take place, concerned with the movement of energy and plasma throughout the solar atmosphere. This thesis makes use of four instruments that have studied the Sun in the past, and in three cases continue to do so today. Observations from these instruments are combined with synthetic observations obtained from a detailed non-equilibrium ionisation hydrodynamic radiation code to understand the nature of what was observed and deduce physical information. One study presents the replication of light curves of a loop obtained by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA). It finds that it was a cold loop heated by a pulse of energy at its footpoint consistent with the energy of a nano are. Another study replicates line proles of a structure observed by the Extreme-Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) within an outflow region. We find that it is best modelled by a long loop consisting of at least 100 strands undergoing a cyclical process of heating and cooling on timescales of approximately 80 minutes. A final study replicates line profiles from the Solar Ultraviolet Measurements of Emitted Radiation (SUMER) instrument, and uses images from the Transition Region and Coronal Explorer (TRACE) to add context to the interpretation.
Supervisor: Morgan, Huw ; Taroyan, Youra ; Vellender, Adam ; Mishuris, Gennady Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.720608  DOI: Not available
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