Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.719240
Title: Numerical studies of gasoline direct injection engine processes
Author: Beavis, Nicholas J.
Awarding Body: Loughborough University
Current Institution: Loughborough University
Date of Award: 2017
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Abstract:
The GDI engine has a number of practical advantages over the more traditional port-fuel injection strategy, however a number of challenges remain the subject of continued research in an attempt to fully exploit the advantages of the GDI engine. These include complex in-cylinder flow fields and fuel-air mixing strategies, and significant temporal variation, both through an engine cycle and on a cycle-by-cycle basis. Despite advances in experimental techniques, the relative difficulty and cost of taking detailed measurements remains high, thus computational techniques are an integral part of research activities. The research work presented in this thesis has focused on the use of detailed 3D-CFD techniques for investigating physical phenomena of the in-cylinder flow field and fuel injection process in a single cylinder GDI engine with early injection event. A detailed validation of the numerical predictions of the in-cylinder flow field using both the RANS RNG k-ε turbulence model and the Smagorinsky LES SGS turbulence model was completed with both models showing good agreement against available experimental results. A detailed validation of the numerical predictions of the fuel injection process using a Lagrangian DDM and both RANS RNG k-ε turbulence model and Smagorinsky LES SGS turbulence model was completed with both models showing excellent agreement against experimental data. The model was then used to investigate the in-cylinder flow field and fuel injection process including research into: the three dimensional nature of the flow field; intake valve jet flapping, characterisation, causality and CCV, and whether it could account for CCV of the mixture field at spark timing; the anisotropic characteristics of the flow field using both the fluctuating velocity and turbulence intensity, including the increase in anisotropy due to the fuel injection event; the use of POD for quantitatively analysing the in-cylinder flow field; investigations into the intake valve, cylinder liner and piston crown spray plume impingement processes, including the use of a multi-component fuel surrogate and CCV of the formed liquid film; characterisation and CCV of the mixture field though the intake and compression strokes up to spark timing. Finally, the predicted turbulence characteristics were used to evaluate the resultant premixed turbulent combustion event using combustion regime diagrams.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: EPSRC ; JLR
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.719240  DOI: Not available
Keywords: GDI ; Gasoline ; Engines ; Injection ; Internal combustion engines ; CFD
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