Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.718612
Title: Dialogues incorporating enthymemes and modelling of other agents' beliefs
Author: Hosseini, Seyed Ali
Awarding Body: King's College London
Current Institution: King's College London (University of London)
Date of Award: 2017
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Abstract:
This thesis provides a formal treatment of the utilisation of enthymemes in dialogical settings, and thus contributes to the formalisation of a key argumentative practice ubiquitous in real world dialogues. The underlying argumentation formalism of our work is ASPIC+, a general framework for structured argumentation which is shown to capture existing systems for argumentation based reasoning. Due to ASPIC+’s lack of support for enthymemes, we modify the ASPIC+ framework so as to enable representation of a broad range of argumentative structures, including arguments and enthymemes. We formalise how an agent i can utilise its model of another agent j's beliefs and arguments, in order to construct enthymemes from its arguments to send to j, while attempting to ensure that j is capable of reconstructing the original arguments from their respective enthymemes. We then formally define the process of reconstructing the argument from which a received enthymeme was originally constructed, similarly using agents’ models of each others’ beliefs and arguments. We define mechanisms for constructing and maintaining an agent’s model of another agent’s beliefs and arguments. The mechanisms are based on agents’ dialogical exchanges, as well as their quantitatively measured like-mindedness. The latter harnesses the notion that agents in the environment are distributed in groups and communities that are formed on the basis of agents’ intrinsic and extrinsic properties. We then present a general framework for argumentation based dialogue. The framework formalises core elements that are common amongst existing dialogue systems while abstracting away from the details that restricts it to particular systems or specific dialogue types. To illustrate its generality, the framework is instantiated to capture existing dialogue systems, each for a different dialogue type. The framework is then instantiated to represent a system for a new dialogue type, called resolution. Resolution dialogues are designed to be easily embedded within other dialogues of potentially differing types, and enable their resolution dialogues can additionally capture and generalise one of the primary dialogical mechanisms in existing dialogue systems, and can formalise information-seeking and potentially inquiry dialogues. We then show that resolution dialogues can additionally capture and generalise one of the primary dialogical mechanisms in existing dialogue systems, and can formalise information-seeking and potentially inquiry dialogues.
Supervisor: Modgil, Sanjay ; Rodrigues, Odinaldo Teixeira Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.718612  DOI: Not available
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