Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.716062
Title: Design, synthesis and biological evaluation of nucleoside phosphoramidates with potential anticancer activity
Author: Jimenez Antunez, Carmen
Awarding Body: Cardiff University
Current Institution: Cardiff University
Date of Award: 2017
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Abstract:
One in seven approved anticancer drugs in the UK are nucleoside analogues (NA). However, frequent development of resistances and unpredictable toxicity are crucial drawbacks of these compounds. Some of the main resistance mechanisms against NAs include limited cellular permeability and decreased initial phosphorylation of the NAs, thus limiting the concentration of active NAs inside the target cells. The ProTide approach is a pronucleotide technology that successfully overcomes these drawbacks by releasing the monophosphorylated NA into the cell and has led to multiple clinical candidate drugs. This work was focussed on the application of the ProTide approach to novel and known anticancer NAs with the aim of improving their performance and pharmacological properties. Herein, new synthesis and optimisation of selected pyridine and purine NA with modifications in the base and / or in the sugar moieties, along with different synthetic approaches to build the prodrugs are reported. The anticancer activity of the compounds was evaluated via cell viability assays, and the activation of the prodrugs and resistance to enzymatic degradation was proved via enzymatic assays involving Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) or spectrophotometric methods. Molecular modelling studies were performed in order to understand the interaction of the ProTides and their metabolites with the enzymes. Finally, the family with the best in vitro activity results was enlarged by developing novel ProTide-related nucleoside diamidate prodrugs, which aimed to further improve their bioavailability and stability characteristics.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.716062  DOI: Not available
Keywords: RC0254 Neoplasms. Tumors. Oncology (including Cancer) ; RM Therapeutics. Pharmacology
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