Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.714946
Title: Electrochemical studies of interfacial polymerisation processes
Author: Oseland, Elizabeth E.
Awarding Body: University of Warwick
Current Institution: University of Warwick
Date of Award: 2016
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Abstract:
This thesis describes how electrochemical analytical techniques have been used to understand some of the physicochemical processes that underpin interfacial polymerisation reactions. A few of the reaction systems studied are currently used in the agrichemical industry for the formation of microcapsules for active ingredient encapsulation. Interfacial processes that take place at the oil-water interface of an epoxy-amine emulsion polymerisation system have been studied. Time-lapse microscopy of epoxide droplets in water or aqueous amine solutions has shown the effect of temperature on droplet dissolution and interfacial polymerisation. Quantitative kinetic data were extracted. A combination of microelectrochemical measurements at expanding droplets and finite element modelling has been used to measure the fast transfer of amine out of an organic phase comprised of epoxide and amine into the aqueous phase. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy was used to monitor a growing poly(urea) film formed at a model liquid/liquid interface at the tip of a micropipette. A simple circuit diagram was used to model the liquid/liquid interface before and after film formation, highlighting how the presence of the film will increase interfacial resistance and decrease interfacial capacitance. Poly(urea) formation under a range of different reaction conditions was investigated using a combination of impedance versus time measurements and scanning electron microscopy. Finally, the polymerisation of acrylamide monomers at a solid/liquid interface for discrete surface functionalisation was examined using a combination of scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.714946  DOI: Not available
Keywords: QD Chemistry
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