Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.714218
Title: Students' academic expectations and experience during the first year of their undergraduate nursing programme
Author: Grant, Janice M.
Awarding Body: University of Salford
Current Institution: University of Salford
Date of Award: 2012
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Abstract:
The thesis examines why first year nursing students leave their programme of study and the factors that influence whether they stay or leave. A descriptive, exploratory study design was undertaken using two survey instruments, the College Students Expectations Questionnaire and the College Student Experiences Questionnaire. Data about the expectations and experiences of one cohort of nursing students were collected at the beginning and compared with experiences the end of their first year of study. Additional data obtained from institutional records. There was a preponderance of first generation university students who entered the university through completion of an Access to Health Studies course. This group entertained similar high expectations of academic achievement to the school leavers. These expectations were not that was not matched by their experiences in the main. The most successful students being those in the 30 to 39 age group. Overall, students’ degree classifications did not match their expected performance. The findings show that most students who left the programme intended to return but did not do so. Identifying predictors of success for nursing students remains a key issue for the nursing profession. The findings indicate that although student attrition is multi-factorial, focussing on the predictors of success can overshadow the need to identify and support students who possess the potential for success if additional support is provided. The findings also underline the importance of helping students connect with their learning environment during the first year and to develop self efficacy skills early.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.714218  DOI: Not available
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