Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.713499
Title: Attitudes toward prenatal diagnosis and termination of pregnancy in Pakistan
Author: Jafri, Syed Hussain
Awarding Body: University of Leeds
Current Institution: University of Leeds
Date of Award: 2017
Availability of Full Text:
Full text unavailable from EThOS. Thesis embargoed until 01 Jul 2035
Abstract:
Introduction: Prenatal diagnosis for genetic conditions has been available in Pakistan since 1994, however very little is known about this population's attitudes toward prenatal diagnosis or termination of affected pregnancies for different conditions. Advances in molecular biology mean it is possible to offer prenatal diagnosis for an increasing number of conditions and therefore, it is important to assess these attitudes. Objective: To explore Pakistani parents' attitudes toward prenatal diagnosis and termination of affected pregnancies for a range of conditions and the factors that contribute towards such attitudes in parents with and without children affected with conditions. Methodology: Attitudes of 400 parents (200 with affected and 200 with unaffected children) towards diagnosis and termination of pregnancy for 30 different genetic conditions were explored, using a UK questionnaire (Hewison et al., 2007). Factors that affect parents' attitudes towards diagnosis and termination of pregnancy for different genetic conditions were also explored through interviews with 40 parents (20 with affected and 20 with unaffected children). Results: Parents held favourable attitudes to prenatal diagnosis and termination of pregnancy for different conditions. Only 3% of parents wanted no prenatal diagnosis and 13.8% did not want termination of pregnancy at all. Mothers and fathers had similar attitudes towards prenatal diagnosis and termination of pregnancy but mothers had higher acceptability of prenatal diagnosis and termination of pregnancy than fathers. Similarly, parents with affected children were more in favour of prenatal diagnosis and termination of pregnancy than parents with unaffected children. The variation in parents' attitudes showed that there was more acceptability for prenatal diagnosis and termination of pregnancy for conditions perceived to be more severe. The most important factors in most parents' decision about termination of pregnancy were suffering of the child and the family, negative attitudes of society, availability of required resources to care for an affected child and and religious beliefs. There was lack of awareness about Islam's stance on termination of pregnancy. The role of family members and health care providers in decision making related to prenatal diagnosis and termination of pregnancy was considered important by some but not all parents. Conclusion: The findings challenged the stereotypes about the non acceptance of termination of pregnancy for genetic conditions in Muslim populations. There is a need to raise awareness of genetic conditions, Islam's stance on termination of pregnancy and availability of screening and prevention services of genetic conditions in Pakistan. The study also highlighted the need for a comprehensive policy on the offer of testing and termination for genetic conditions in Pakistan to ensure easy access to at-risk parents. Furthermore, clinical guidelines should be developed for healthcare providers to facilitate autonomous decision making through the provision of information for parents on testing and termination issues. Technological advances in the field of genetic testing are not only providing more reproductive choices to parents but are also presenting them with more dilemmas.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.713499  DOI: Not available
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