Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.712717
Title: Voice in radio
Author: Preston, Jon
Awarding Body: Goldsmiths, University of London
Current Institution: Goldsmiths College (University of London)
Date of Award: 2017
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Abstract:
“Voice in Radio” is a practice-based thesis. It reflects on a series of participatory media projects involving community groups and secondary school students working together to produce radio shows. The thesis offers an analysis of those projects through the academic prism of ‘voice’, a term defined in both the personal and socio-political senses. Further, it reflects on the possibilities for voice offered by Participatory Community Radio (PCR) practice. Having devised and led this practice, I occupy the position of a ‘reflexive practitioner’ in the study. The thesis is presented as a linear narrative: through PCR, a participant hears their own physical voice as others do, externally; they first become accustomed to and then comfortable with the sound of their own voice; they gain agency, becoming able to vocalise their stories through the radio project work; they gain further agency through socio-political Voice as their work is aired in a series of radio shows. The participant groups are from a selection of cohorts encompassing a ‘Senior Citizens West Indian Luncheon and Social club’, a boys’ secondary school, a hospice, an Arts school and a Pupil Referral Unit (PRU). The data presented were collected through a mixed methods strategy. Project work and participant reflections are offered, together with comments from associated professionals. This material features in both written and aural form. The ideas of authors including Berry, Chomsky, Couldry, Coyer, Dowmunt, Mayo and Rodenburg are drawn upon to establish the project work within a framework for discussion. Conclusions are offered on the possibilities of PCR in a neo-liberal economic and cultural climate specifically in relation to empowerment, voice and exchange. An hour-long audio CD accompanies the written thesis as an illustration of the PCR practice under review. Combined, these two elements offer an investigation into “Voice in Radio”.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.712717  DOI: Not available
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