Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.712679
Title: Pattern formation in Mississippi valley-type deposits : identifying one of nature's fundamental processes in geologic systems
Author: Kelka, Ulrich
Awarding Body: University of Glasgow
Current Institution: University of Glasgow
Date of Award: 2017
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Abstract:
Nature has a range of distinct mechanisms that cause initially heterogeneous systems to break their symmetry and form patterns. The study of pattern formation and the behaviour of non-linear systems have interested scientists across many disciplines from physics, chemistry, biology, and economics to geosciences. In study, a new mechano-chemical process that leads to the formation of complex periodic wave- or stripe-like zebra patterns in rocks will be presented. The genesis of periodically banded dolostones, which host lead-zinc mineralization, has been studied for several years, because an evolutionary relationship between the banded dolomites and mineralized areas is highly likely. To date, a complete generic model has not been formulated for the formation of these zebra rocks and there is an ongoing debate on the exact processes leading to the genesis of the pattern. In the first part of this work, new analytical findings obtained from zebra dolomites from Peru and Germany will be presented. The zebra dolomites from Germany have never been described before and represent the first known zebra dolomite deposit in Germany. Based on the analytical finding, a numerical and an analytical model were developed in the second part of this thesis. The combination of the numerical and the analytical model yields a new approach to the zebra pattern formation based on one of nature’s fundamental processes for wave-like pattern formation in geological systems. This approach also includes a new inversion routine based on the spacing of the respective pattern.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.712679  DOI: Not available
Keywords: QE Geology
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