Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.707434
Title: Social Dream-Drawing (SDD) : praxis and research
Author: Mersky, Rose Redding
ISNI:       0000 0004 6062 1140
Awarding Body: University of the West of England
Current Institution: University of the West of England, Bristol
Date of Award: 2017
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Abstract:
Social Dream-Drawing is a socioanalytic praxis conceived, developed and researched by myself as a psycho-social action researcher. Although it is built upon related praxes, such as Social Dreaming, Organisational Role Analysis and the Social Photo-Matrix, its unique contribution is the work with drawings of dreams done by participants, relating to an identified theme. The theory underlying all of these praxes is that thoughts from the unconscious can be made available to consciousness by the processes of free association and amplification. They can be further reflected upon and then used as the basis for intervention in organisations. The theme that I used for four of the five different groups that I worked with is “What do I risk in my work?” and my research goal was to “to evaluate the benefits of this type of developmental methodology for the work of organisational role holders”. I have worked with twenty-one participants in five different groups in four different countries. This study is among the first to actually use psycho-social research to demonstrate the value of a socioanalytic praxis. My three major findings are as follows: 1. SDD is a very valuable individual transformative professional learning experience. 2. SDD contains and supports those going through major transitions, either professional or personal. 3. SDD helps groups identify and explore their underlying systemic dynamics. The dissertation itself is divided into two sections. The first is devoted to the praxis itself, its underlying theory and development. The second focuses on the philosophy, methodology, methods, findings and ethics relating to the action research I undertook. I use the metaphor of the helix to capture my dual consultant/action researcher and psycho-social researcher roles. The dissertation ends with reflections on the experience, concerns and cautions about the use of this praxis and thoughts for possible next steps in using this praxis for organisational development interventions.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.707434  DOI: Not available
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