Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.707351
Title: Shakespeare and the soundtrack
Author: Lin, Samantha Xin Ying
ISNI:       0000 0004 6061 7088
Awarding Body: Queen's University Belfast
Current Institution: Queen's University Belfast
Date of Award: 2016
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Abstract:
This thesis combines the multidisciplinary fields of literary, film, music, and cultural studies in a timely re-positioning and re-evaluation of the current scholarship on Shakespeare film adaptations. It considers various aspects of the soundtrack from a range of sound films, and includes discussions of non-Anglophone adaptations. By challenging the traditional audio-centric hierarchy prominent in both film studies and human perception, 1 demonstrate the auditory dimension’s significant contributions in facilitating stage-to-screen transitions, and seek to decentralise the ‘word as image’ preoccupation currently dominating the discourse on cinematic Shakespeares. Chapter 1 examines the non-musical sound effects employed in a number of films, primarily to support an adaptation’s ’updated’ setting, and to lend verisimilitude to cinematic battle sequences. Focusing on the manifestations of Western 'art music’, Chapter 2 discusses the cinematic and cultural effects of original film ’scores* and classical music citations. Chapter 3, by contrast, evaluates insertions of popular music and covers, which both provide adaptations with an additional level of accessibility. Chapter 4 departs from Anglophone films, and turns Its critical attention to Asian films and their soundtracks in order to engage with current debates about Shakespeare’s status and efficacy on the global-local spectrum. Returning to the play-texts, Chapter 5 assesses the filmic functions of both the early modem and film-original musical settings of Shakespeare's songs. Finally, Chapter 6 demonstrates a method of analysing oft-overlooked cinematic silences, thus concluding this groundbreaking thesis on a particularly polemical note.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.707351  DOI: Not available
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