Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.706977
Title: Exploring the relationship between alcohol use disorders and internalising disorders in longitudinal cohorts of adolescents
Author: Homman, Lina Elisabeth
ISNI:       0000 0004 6060 0745
Awarding Body: Queen's University Belfast
Current Institution: Queen's University Belfast
Date of Award: 2016
Availability of Full Text:
Full text unavailable from EThOS. Please contact the current institution’s library for further details.
Abstract:
The literature supports a relationship between alcohol use disorders and internalising disorders, but how they relate to each other is unclear. Both disorders, as well as their comorbidity increase in adolescence, making this period of time of particular interest. The main objective of the present thesis was to investigate the relationship between alcohol use disorders and internalising disorders in longitudinal cohorts of adolescents. 1 was interested in the relationship in terms of causality, developmental growth relationships, latent growth trajectories, gender differences, whether the relationship differs with age and whether externalising disorders had an impact on the relationship. To assess these aims, two longitudinal, self-reported, prospective cohorts of adolescents were available for the present thesis. In order to investigate the relationship several statistical methods were applied, such as cross-lagged panel analyses, latent growth models, parallel growth models and growth mixture models. Results did indicate a significant relationship between alcohol use disorders and internalising disorder but a weak and sometimes negative relationship between alcohol use and internalising disorders. The relationships differed by age, gender and sample. In both samples, a bidirectional relationship between alcohol use disorders and internalising disorders was observed when development was taken into account. Latent trajectories supported a bidirectional relationship, driven by different disorders in different groups, as well as a model of self-medication. The model indicated that several different pathways explained the association between alcohol problems and internalising symptoms. Pathway presented tended to depend on factors such as age, gender, whether anxiety was assessed or not, and characteristics of the sample. Our results provided a possible explanation to the inconsistencies in the literature, either by suggesting that several pathways are present between the two disorders or that the association is so weak that it is hard to pick up on.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.706977  DOI: Not available
Share: