Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.706952
Title: Young people, regulation and risk : a case study of the Mosquito Teenage Deterrent (MTD) in the UK
Author: Maher, J.
Awarding Body: University of Liverpool
Current Institution: University of Liverpool
Date of Award: 2016
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Abstract:
The development and marketing of the Mosquito Teenage Deterrent (MTD) emerged during a period where young people as a social group have been subject to various regulatory processes and systems that are both formal and passive. In this thesis, the MTD has been used as a case study to investigate how different stakeholder groups have approached this technology and how the development and distribution of the MTD within the UK has been affected by discourses of regulation and risk, policy and practice. Despite the intentions of opposition groups to invoke legal challenges to the use of the MTD on the grounds that it breaches the human rights of children and young people, this has not happened. In fact the use of MTDs is less than anticipated and public authority demand for the devices (as well as all sales) started to decline from 2007. The analysis conducted in this thesis demonstrates that regulation was manifested in multiple and connected ways, by law and through constructions of risk, and that this was largely influenced by the dominant social construction of young people held by the public authorities. Children and young people are shown to be regularly viewed as a group that was potentially dangerous and therefore needing to be regulated, but also a group that was potentially vulnerable and needing regulation. The thesis elucidates that the MTD was being used to control children and young people’s access to space by acting as a temporary intervention until permanent measures can be put in place.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.706952  DOI: Not available
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