Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.706858
Title: Investigation of the interaction between Ebola virus and the host
Author: Garcia-Dorival, G. I.
ISNI:       0000 0004 6059 412X
Awarding Body: University of Liverpool
Current Institution: University of Liverpool
Date of Award: 2016
Availability of Full Text:
Access through EThOS:
Full text unavailable from EThOS. Thesis embargoed until 01 Jan 2022
Access through Institution:
Abstract:
Ebola viruses cause viral haemorrhagic fever in humans and non human primates. Due to the severity of their symptoms, the lack of an approved treatment or vaccine, and the mechanism of transmission, these viruses have been classified as containment level 4 (CL4) pathogens. In December 2013, an Ebola virus outbreak initiated in West Africa, which lasted more than two years, and has been considered the worst outbreak in the history of the Ebola viruses. More than twenty-seven thousand people had a positive diagnosis of infection with more than eleven thousand confirmed dead. This outbreak highlights not only the urgent necessity for new treatments and vaccines against this virus but also that there is still a large knowledge gap for Ebola viruses compared to other pathogens. This thesis focuses on using high resolution approaches to characterise the interaction between the Zaire ebolavirus species (EBOV) and the host. The work focuses on using high resolution sequencing to characterise the evolution of EBOV throughout the outbreak in West Africa and also in adapting to grow in a novel host. The work also focuses on two viral proteins that are critical to the virus life cycle. The VP24 protein that is an interferon antagonist and the nucleoprotein (NP) which encapsidates the viral genome. Quantitative proteomics was used to identify host cell proteins that interacted with these viral proteins and inhibitors were used to ablate cellular protein function and monitor the effect on viral biology. The thesis is written in the style of ‘by publication’ and the publications associated with this work are reproduced in the Appendix.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.706858  DOI: Not available
Share: