Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.705156
Title: Losing an identical co-twin in older adulthood : an interpretative phenomenological analysis
Author: Dookhun, Miriam
ISNI:       0000 0004 6058 8619
Awarding Body: University of East London
Current Institution: University of East London
Date of Award: 2016
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Abstract:
This is a qualitative study exploring the experience of the loss of an identical co-twin in older adulthood. Ten participants were recruited for the study through the biggest twin registry in the United Kingdom (UK): TwinsUK. All ten were interviewed, and transcripts of the interviews were analysed using Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis (IPA). Five key themes, referred to in this study as ‘master themes’, emerged from the analysis: The Twin Relationship, Embodiment, Separation, Preservation of a Connection, and Grief Comparisons. The analysis highlighted two central ideas: embodiment and identity. The study aligns with several existing frameworks for understanding twins and bereavement, including a unit identity and feelings of a loss of part of the self with the bereavement. The study also supports ideas about embodied grief, continuing bonds with the deceased, and co-twin loss being worse than other kinds of losses. Some distinctive contributions to Counselling Psychology and the understanding of bereavement are seen, for example a violent dimension within embodied grief is highlighted. In addition there are aspects of continuing bonds with the deceased in cotwin relationships that differ from continuing bonds in other relationships. Furthermore, co-twin loss was felt by some participants to be worse than other types of losses. This last finding has also arisen in previous research, and this study sheds some light on why research participants have felt this way.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Prof.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.705156  DOI: Not available
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