Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.702158
Title: Landscapes of dissent : the development and materiality of nonconformity in three rural communities
Author: Butler, Matthew Nicholas
ISNI:       0000 0004 6056 6559
Awarding Body: University of Bristol
Current Institution: University of Bristol
Date of Award: 2016
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Abstract:
There are few modern studies of the impact of nonconformity at a rural and local level in Great Britain. This dissertation attempts to see what a multi-disciplinary approach - using archaeology, architectural history, historical sources and oral narratives - focusing in particular on the landscape and the material remains left by Dissenting Groups, can add to our knowledge and understanding of their origins and development. It then takes this knowledge and applies it to answer or inform several of the important questions being posed by others involved in the study of nonconformity across a variety of academic disciplines. It considers the impact of three very different groups in three contrasting landscapes, each landscape covering a progressively larger geographical area: The Strict and Particular Baptists of Grittleton, a village in north Wiltshire; the Associate Congregation on the Orkney island of Stronsay; and the Bible Christians on Exmoor and Brendon in Somerset. The study concludes that these different non-Conformist congregations had a material impact on their landscape, and often viewed the landscape in unprecedented and unusual ways, although the material remains are often fragmentary and sometimes disappointing. Particular individuals at a local leve1 and the power of faith in congregations often had a remarkable impact on the landscape The Dissertation shows how these buildings and landscapes are often neglected and under continuing threat: in Orkney, for example, the author surveyed several Dissenting Kirks for the first time ever; many Chapels throughout Great Britain face demolition, conversion or gradual decay and ruination; the collective memory is shrinking as members of congregations and smaller sects literally die off.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.702158  DOI: Not available
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