Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.701979
Title: Britain and Chile in the independence era : a cultural history 1806-1831
Author: Baeza, Andrés
ISNI:       0000 0004 5994 4524
Awarding Body: University of Bristol
Current Institution: University of Bristol
Date of Award: 2016
Availability of Full Text:
Access from EThOS:
Abstract:
This thesis delves onto the relations between Britain and Chile during the shifting and dynamic years of the Spanish American independence (1806-1831). I explore how Britons and Chileans perceived each other from the perspective of cultural history, considering the consequences of these ' cultural encounters' for the subsequent nation- state building process. It is state,d that from 1806 to 1831 both British and Chilean ' state and non-state ' actors interacted across several different 'contact zones', and thereby configured this relationship in multiple ways. These interactions reveal that although the extensive presence of ' non-state ' actors was a manifestation of the 'expansion' of British interests to Chile, they were not necessarily an expression of any British imperial policy. In a first moment (1806- 1808), interactions were held in an inter-state level and were expressed in both plans to invade Chile and to defend it. From 1808 to the 1817 interactions were mainly held between ' non-state ' actors such as missionaries, educators, seamen and traders as a result of Britain's neutrality policy which restrained state actors to interfere in the Spanish American independence struggles. From 1817 to 1831' both state and non-state actors overlapped as a result of both the inauguration of negotiations for British recognition of the independence and the opening of trade, which encouraged thousands of traders to settle in Chile. During the Independence era there were multiple attitudes, perceptions, representations and discourses by Chileans on the role played by Britain in the world, which changed depending on the circumstances. Likewise, for Britons, Chile was represented in multiple ways, being the most predominant the image of Chile as a pathway to other markets and destinations. All these had repercussions in the early nation-building process.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.701979  DOI: Not available
Share: