Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.700724
Title: Wavelets and sparse methods for image reconstruction and classification in neuroimaging
Author: Romaniuk, Michal
ISNI:       0000 0004 5994 3724
Awarding Body: Imperial College London
Current Institution: Imperial College London
Date of Award: 2016
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Abstract:
This dissertation contributes to neuroimaging literature in the fields of compressed sensing magnetic resonance imaging (CS-MRI) and image-based detection of Alzheimer's disease (AD). It consists of three main contributions, based on wavelets and sparse methods. The first contribution is a method for wavelet packet basis optimisation for sparse approximation and compressed sensing reconstruction of magnetic resonance (MR) images of the brain. The proposed method is based on the basis search algorithm developed by Coifman and Wickerhauser, with a cost function designed specifically for compressed sensing. It is tested on MR images available from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI). The second contribution consists of evaluating and comparing several sparse classification methods in an application to detection of AD based on positron emission tomography (PET) images of the brain. This comparison includes univariate feature selection, feature clustering and classifiers that automatically select a small subset of features due to their mathematical or algorithmic construction. The evaluation is based on PET images available from ADNI. The third contribution is proposing an extension of wavelet-based scattering networks (originally proposed by Mallat and Bruna) to three-dimensional tomographic images. The proposed extension is evaluated as a feature representation in an application to detection of AD based on MR images available from ADNI. There are several possible extensions of the work presented in this dissertation. The wavelet packet basis search method proposed in the first contribution can be improved to take into account the coherence between the sparse approximation basis and the sensing basis. The evaluation presented in the second contribution can be extended with additional algorithms to make it more comprehensive. The three-dimensional scattering networks that are the core part of the third contribution can be combined with other machine learning methods, such as manifold learning or deep convolutional neural networks. As a whole, the methods proposed in this dissertation contribute to the work towards efficient screening for Alzheimer's disease, by making MRI scans of the brain faster and helping to automate image analysis for AD detection. The first contribution is a method for wavelet packet basis optimisation for sparse approximation and compressed sensing reconstruction of magnetic resonance (MR) images of the brain. The proposed method is based on the basis search algorithm developed by Coifman and Wickerhauser, with a cost function designed specifically for compressed sensing. It is tested on MR images available from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI). The second contribution consists of evaluating and comparing several sparse classification methods in an application to detection of AD based on positron emission tomography (PET) images of the brain. This comparison includes univariate feature selection, feature clustering and classifiers that automatically select a small subset of features due to their mathematical or algorithmic construction. The evaluation is based on PET images available from ADNI. The third contribution is proposing an extension of wavelet-based scattering networks (originally proposed by Mallat and Bruna) to three-dimensional tomographic images. The proposed extension is evaluated as a feature representation in an application to detection of AD based on MR images available from ADNI. There are several possible extensions of the work presented in this dissertation. The wavelet packet basis search method proposed in the first contribution can be improved to take into account the coherence between the sparse approximation basis and the sensing basis. The evaluation presented in the second contribution can be extended with additional algorithms to make it more comprehensive. The three-dimensional scattering networks that are the core part of the third contribution can be combined with other machine learning methods, such as manifold learning or deep convolutional neural networks. This dissertation contributes to neuroimaging literature in the fields of compressed sensing magnetic resonance imaging (CS-MRI) and image-based detection of Alzheimer's disease (AD). It consists of three main contributions, based on wavelets and sparse methods. The first contribution is a method for wavelet packet basis optimisation for sparse approximation and compressed sensing reconstruction of magnetic resonance (MR) images of the brain. The proposed method is based on the basis search algorithm developed by Coifman and Wickerhauser, with a cost function designed specifically for compressed sensing. It is tested on MR images available from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI). The second contribution consists of evaluating and comparing several sparse classification methods in an application to detection of AD based on positron emission tomography (PET) images of the brain. This comparison includes univariate feature selection, feature clustering and classifiers that automatically select a small subset of features due to their mathematical or algorithmic construction. The evaluation is based on PET images available from ADNI. The third contribution is proposing an extension of wavelet-based scattering networks (originally proposed by Mallat and Bruna) to three-dimensional tomographic images. The proposed extension is evaluated as a feature representation in an application to detection of AD based on MR images available from ADNI. There are several possible extensions of the work presented in this dissertation. The wavelet packet basis search method proposed in the first contribution can be improved to take into account the coherence between the sparse approximation basis and the sensing basis. The evaluation presented in the second contribution can be extended with additional algorithms to make it more comprehensive. The three-dimensional scattering networks that are the core part of the third contribution can be combined with other machine learning methods, such as manifold learning or deep convolutional neural networks. As a whole, the methods proposed in this dissertation contribute to the work towards efficient screening for Alzheimer's disease, by making MRI scans of the brain faster and helping to automate image analysis for AD detection.
Supervisor: Rueckert, Daniel Sponsor: Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.700724  DOI: Not available
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