Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.699269
Title: Multi-scale edge-guided image gap restoration
Author: Langari, Bahareh
ISNI:       0000 0004 5988 8649
Awarding Body: Brunel University London
Current Institution: Brunel University
Date of Award: 2016
Availability of Full Text:
Access through EThOS:
Access through Institution:
Abstract:
The focus of this research work is the estimation of gaps (missing blocks) in digital images. To progress the research two main issues were identified as (1) the appropriate domains for image gap restoration and (2) the methodologies for gap interpolation. Multi-scale transforms provide an appropriate framework for gap restoration. The main advantages are transformations into a set of frequency and scales and the ability to progressively reduce the size of the gap to one sample wide at the transform apex. Two types of multi-scale transform were considered for comparative evaluation; 2-dimensional (2D) discrete cosines (DCT) pyramid and 2D discrete wavelets (DWT). For image gap estimation, a family of conventional weighted interpolators and directional edge-guided interpolators are developed and evaluated. Two types of edges were considered; ‘local’ edges or textures and ‘global’ edges such as the boundaries between objects or within/across patterns in the image. For local edge, or texture, modelling a number of methods were explored which aim to reconstruct a set of gradients across the restored gap as those computed from the known neighbourhood. These differential gradients are estimated along the geometrical vertical, horizontal and cross directions for each pixel of the gap. The edge-guided interpolators aim to operate on distinct regions confined within edge lines. For global edge-guided interpolation, two main methods explored are Sobel and Canny detectors. The latter provides improved edge detection. The combination and integration of different multi-scale domains, local edge interpolators, global edge-guided interpolators and iterative estimation of edges provided a variety of configurations that were comparatively explored and evaluated. For evaluation a set of images commonly used in the literature work were employed together with simulated regular and random image gaps at a variety of loss rate. The performance measures used are the peak signal to noise ratio (PSNR) and structure similarity index (SSIM). The results obtained are better than the state of the art reported in the literature.
Supervisor: Stonham, J. Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.699269  DOI: Not available
Keywords: Edge detection ; Pyramid transformation ; Signal processing/Image processing
Share: