Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.699191
Title: What is the relationship between relational security, attachment, ward incidents and treatment outcomes on forensic psychiatric wards?
Author: Arsuffi, Lara
ISNI:       0000 0004 5994 8330
Awarding Body: University of Birmingham
Current Institution: University of Birmingham
Date of Award: 2017
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Abstract:
A systematic literature review summarizes what is known about the relationships between attachment, relational security and therapeutic relationships. A paucity of research with forensic populations is noted. Consequently the empirical research paper explores more systematically the relationships between these variables on forensic psychiatric wards. Suggestions for staff and service development are presented. No relationships were found between relational security and service users’ attachment to the service and between relational security and risk events and treatment outcomes. Additional analyses revealed that relational security and ward atmosphere were moderately correlated. A large positive correlation was found between patients’ attachment to the service and ward atmosphere, and a moderate, negative, relationship was found between patients’ attachment to the service and risk incidents Multiple regression revealed that relational security and ward atmosphere significantly predicted patients’ attachment to the service. More robust research is needed to investigate the relationships between attachment, relational security, risk incidents and treatment outcomes on forensic psychiatric wards. An argument is made for promoting stronger therapeutic relationships between staff and service users so that forensic wards can become closer to secure bases which might help clients to overcome past interpersonal traumas and develop safer ways to relate interpersonally.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: NHS
Qualification Name: Thesis (D.Foren.Psy.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.699191  DOI: Not available
Keywords: RA1001 Forensic Medicine. Medical jurisprudence. Legal medicine
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