Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.699112
Title: Challenging behaviour assessment in individuals with intellectual disabilities and autism spectrum disorder
Author: Waters, Paul
ISNI:       0000 0004 5994 6220
Awarding Body: University of Birmingham
Current Institution: University of Birmingham
Date of Award: 2016
Availability of Full Text:
Access from EThOS:
Access from Institution:
Abstract:
The systematic review examines the association between gastrointestinal disease and behavioural change in individuals with intellectual disabilities and Autism Spectrum Disorder. A systematic search of literature databases identified fourteen relevant research articles. Several behaviour classes associated with gastrointestinal disorder were identified, including challenging behaviour, sleep problems, and anxiety and mood related behaviours. Multiple forms of gastrointestinal disorder were also identified as did the quality of its assessment. There was varying degrees of evidence for an association between certain behaviours and gastrointestinal disorders due to assessment methods and behavioural definitions. The empirical paper reports the development of a challenging behaviour report form. A functional assessment tool and protocol was developed to take into account various factors when assessing challenging behaviour such as pain related behaviours, affect, and precursor behaviours. The assessment was trialled on footage of experimental functional analysis of non-verbal children with Autism Spectrum Disorder. The development of the assessment and inter-observer agreement is reported as well as future directions in the development of the assessment. Volume I also contains a public domain briefing paper, which provides an overview of the systematic review and empirical study.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (D.Clin.Psy.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.699112  DOI: Not available
Keywords: BF Psychology
Share: