Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.698236
Title: Policing transnational crime in Vietnam
Author: Chu, Van Dung
ISNI:       0000 0004 5990 1161
Awarding Body: University of Leeds
Current Institution: University of Leeds
Date of Award: 2016
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Abstract:
Transnational crime is an increasing phenomenon in a diverse and complex late modern societies. This research explores responses to transnational crime in Vietnam, and the place and role of efficiency, fairness and legitimacy therein. Its purpose is to assess the effectiveness and the legitimacy of the policing system for the investigation of transnational crime in Vietnam. Documentary sources and qualitative research interviews are undertaken to identify and evaluate the compliance with effectiveness and legitimacy in the investigation of transnational crime in Vietnam, within laws, policing strategies, and practices of the investigation of transnational crimes. In addition, a comparative research method is used at some points in the research to suggest possible policy transfers from England and Wales into Vietnam. To attain this objective, the research investigates the phenomenon of transnational crime and the extent to which it impacts on transnational crime investigations in Vietnam. Using a ‘cosmopolitanism’ perspective and its key ethical values of effectiveness, fairness and the rule of law, this research first analyses the policing institutional arrangements that are responsible for transnational crime investigation in Vietnam. The research then focuses on the criminalisation of transnational crime and the impact of this on transnational crime investigations. Next, the research considers the legal powers of the police in transnational crime investigation, and assesses the empowerment of investigatory powers to the police, as well as the effectiveness, fairness and the rule of law of those investigatory powers for effective and fair transnational crime investigations. Finally, this research provides conclusions to suggest that the policing system for investigating transnational crime can be advanced considerably by adopting changes based on standards of legitimacy and effectiveness.
Supervisor: Walker, Clive Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.698236  DOI: Not available
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