Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.697561
Title: Symptomatic midfoot osteoarthritis : a clinical epidemiological study of community-dwelling older adults
Author: Thomas, M. J.
Awarding Body: Keele University
Current Institution: Keele University
Date of Award: 2014
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Abstract:
The clinical and epidemiological characterisation of symptomatic osteoarthritis (OA) in the foot has been neglected in relation to other peripheral joint sites. The midfoot complex in particular, has a central role in the regulation of all load-bearing forces that enter the body during locomotion, and yet the contribution of OA to pain and dysfunction in this region is unclear. Cross-sectional analysis revealed that midfoot pain and symptomatic mid foot OA are common, affecting approximately 19% and 12% of community-dwelling older adults respectively. Most individuals reported functional limitation and the pattern of joint involvement, and the association with selected risk factors was consistent with mechanical loading as a contributing cause. Although only about half of adults with symptomatic mid foot OA had consulted a general practitioner (GP) for foot pain in the last 12 months, many were accessing care through allied health professionals and taking oral pain medication. An interviewed subsample of participants with symptomatic mid foot OA (n=ll) reported that GP consultation for foot pain was often triggered by increased, unexplained pain and associated functional limitation. Following consultation, individuals often described being dissatisfied with they perceived as an overemphasis on analgesics and brief, cursory GP assessment. A literature search and narrative synthesis confirmed adequate clinimetric properties for a selection of brief clinical assessments that were then used to examine the clinical recognition of symptomatic midfoot OA in primary care.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.697561  DOI: Not available
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