Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.695851
Title: The endz game : the effects of the London 2012 Olympic Games on the communities of the host boroughs
Author: Panayis, Mitchell
ISNI:       0000 0004 5991 3621
Awarding Body: Kingston University
Current Institution: Kingston University
Date of Award: 2015
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Abstract:
Not since the 1966 World Cup has Britain experienced such an explicit collision of the most mega of sporting-events with the most ordinary of people, with these two phenomena coming into direct contact through the London 2012 Olympic Games. The award of the Games to London led me to begin a six year case study that focused on the relationship between the dominant forces and the people when power, space, finances, reputations and democracy itself are at stake during a Host Cities Olympiad. Whilst Government bodies have published quantitative reports on the economic effects of the Games on the Host Boroughs, and fellow researchers have tackled social issues arising from the Games, from social housing to local employment, this study attempts to report the overall 'experience' of specific members of the local communities affected by the Olympic Games. This collation of experience resulted in a series of short, experimental and feature films, which are discussed within this written thesis, which critically analyses the production of the films in the context of the most relevant existing theoretical frameworks. The project is a critique of ordinary people's experience of this mega-event, and the lessons drawn from this collection of experiences could go some way towards aiding both the International Olympic Committee and event planners in the UK in ensuring future mega-events result in real democratic progress.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.695851  DOI: Not available
Keywords: Communication ; cultural and media studies
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