Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.695712
Title: Reading contradiction : negotiating inconsistency in the politics of Cherríe Moraga
Author: Toocaram, Linda Tulin
ISNI:       0000 0004 5990 7707
Awarding Body: King's College London
Current Institution: King's College London (University of London)
Date of Award: 2014
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Abstract:
Much has been written about Cherríe Moraga’s vision of a ‘Queer Aztlán,’ a postcolonial space where the differences of race, gender and sexuality are recognised, and the hierarchies of oppression amongst subjugated peoples are set aside in order to forge a utopian project of unity. What has yet to be extensively analysed is the utility of contradiction within such a utopian project. This project argues that despite the unifying agenda of Moraga’s politics, Moraga’s oeuvre reinforces a problematic framework of Aristotelian noncontradiction that inscribes, rather than interrogates, difference. This delimiting framework is evident in Moraga’s writing through an exploration of the issues of language, internalised oppression, cross-racial feminist alliance and female indigeneity. In line with my position that Moraga’s politics are a work in progress, a politics of identity requiring constant self-questioning alongside an ever-changing Chicana/o community, an analysis of the political drawbacks of non-contradiction offers fresh avenues for reconfiguring Moraga’s ideas into a more efficacious practice. Addressing these issues requires the use of an interdisciplinary methodology that incorporates considerations of feminism(s); nationalism; critical race theory; colonialism and postcolonialism; as well as literary theory. This interdisciplinary methodology is necessary due to the multi-genred nature of Moraga’s work, involving essay, poetry, drama and fiction, and the far-reaching potential of her politics that requires an analysis of the simultaneity of various forms of oppression.
Supervisor: Castillo Street, Susan Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.695712  DOI: Not available
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